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Rutgers Gender Study Professor Coronarages: F— Each and Every Trump Supporter

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ – A Rutgers University professor this week went on a racist laden tirade against white people and supporters of President Donald J. Trump.  Brittney Cooper, an associate professor in the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Department of the state university is blaming Trump supporters for the Chinese borne COVID-19 coronavirus.

“I am saying some obvious things this morning because as a country we are too good at skipping over the audience and we might as well say this to people as often as we can. Fuck each and every Trump supporter. You all absolutely did this. You are to blame. F— each and every Trump supporter. You absolutely did this. You are to blame,” she said. “I feel like most Black people are clear that this utterly absurd to push to re-open the country is all about a gross necropolitical calculation that it is Black people who are dying disproportionately from COVID.”

Cooper was also the author of a weekly column in Salon.com, her writings have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Cosmo.com, and many others. In 2013 and 2014, she was named to the Root.com’s Root 100, an annual list of Top Black Influencers.

Cooper continued her racist tirade calling white people, white supremacists, “Not only do white conservatives not care about Black life, but my most cynical negative read of the white supremacists among them is that they welcome this massive winnowing of Black folks in order to slow demographic shifts and shore up political power.”

She continued her rant throughout the day on Tuesday.

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“They are literally willing to die from this clusterf—ed COVID response rather than admit absolutely anybody other than him [President Trump] would have been a better president,” she tweeted. “And when whiteness has a death wish, we are all in for a serious problem. Black Lives Matter. Black Lives with hypertension, diabetes, and asthma matter. Fat Black Lives matter. All Black Lives matter.”

Cooper is the author of several books including

Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women (Women, Gender, and Sexuality in American History)

Beyond Respectability charts the development of African American women as public intellectuals and the evolution of their thought from the end of the 1800s through the Black Power era of the 1970s. Eschewing the Great Race Man paradigm so prominent in contemporary discourse, Brittney C. Cooper looks at the far-reaching intellectual achievements of female thinkers and activists like Anna Julia Cooper, Mary Church Terrell, Fannie Barrier Williams, Pauli Murray, and Toni Cade Bambara. Cooper delves into the processes that transformed these women and others into racial leadership figures, including long-overdue discussions of their theoretical output and personal experiences. As Cooper shows, their body of work critically reshaped our understandings of race and gender discourse. It also confronted entrenched ideas of how–and who–produced racial knowledge.

Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower

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So what if it’s true that Black women are mad as hell? They have the right to be. In the Black feminist tradition of Audre Lorde, Brittney Cooper reminds us that anger is a powerful source of energy that can give us the strength to keep on fighting.

Far too often, Black women’s anger has been caricatured into an ugly and destructive force that threatens the civility and social fabric of American democracy. But Cooper shows us that there is more to the story than that. Black women’s eloquent rage is what makes Serena Williams such a powerful tennis player. It’s what makes Beyoncé’s girl power anthems resonate so hard. It’s what makes Michelle Obama an icon. Eloquent rage keeps us all honest and accountable. It reminds women that they don’t have to settle for less.

When Cooper learned of her grandmother’s eloquent rage about love, sex, and marriage in an epic and hilarious front-porch confrontation, her life was changed. And it took another intervention, this time staged by one of her homegirls, to turn Brittney into the fierce feminist she is today. In Brittney Cooper’s world, neither mean girls nor f–kboys ever win. But homegirls emerge as heroes. This audiobook argues that ultimately feminism, friendship, and faith in one’s own superpowers are all we really need to turn things right side up again.

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The Crunk Feminist Collection

For the Crunk Feminist Collective, their academic day jobs were lacking in conversations they actually wanted—relevant, real conversations about how race and gender politics intersect with pop culture and current events. To address this void, they started a blog. Now with an annual readership of nearly one million, their posts foster dialogue about activist methods, intersectionality, and sisterhood. And the writers’ personal identities—as black women; as sisters, daughters, and lovers; and as television watchers, sports fans, and music lovers—are never far from the discussion at hand.

These essays explore “Sex and Power in the Black Church,” discuss how “Clair Huxtable is Dead,” list “Five Ways Talib Kweli Can Become a Better Ally to Women in Hip Hop,” and dwell on “Dating with a Doctorate (She Got a Big Ego?).” Self-described as “critical homegirls,” the authors tackle life stuck between loving hip hop and ratchet culture while hating patriarchy, misogyny, and sexism.

 

 

 

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