Dulles CBP Officers Seize $29K in Unreported Currency from Congolese Man

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WASHINGTON DULLES, USA - 10 APRIL 2019: Washington Dulles International Airport is floodlit at dawn

STERLING, Virginia – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized $29,900 in unreported currency from a man who arrived on a flight from Ethiopia at Washington Dulles International Airport on Tuesday.

CBP officers interviewed the Congolese national traveler and explained the U.S. currency reporting law to him. The traveler declared both verbally and in writing that he possessed $10,000. During an inspection, CBP officers discovered a total of $29,900 in the man’s possession.

Customs and Border Protection officers seized $29,900 in unreported currency at Washington Dulles International Airport on February 8, 2022, from a man who arrived on a flight from Ethiopia.CBP officers seized the currency for violating U.S. currency reporting laws, then released the man. CBP is not releasing the traveler’s name because he was not criminally charged.

There is no limit to how much currency or other monetary instruments travelers may bring to or take out of the United States; however, federal law [31 U.S.C. 5316] requires travelers to report all currency $10,000 or greater to a CBP officer and captured on U.S. Treasury Department form (FINCEN 105).

Travelers can get an early start on completing reporting their currency by completing the FINCEN 105 prior to traveling to the United States. Read more about currency reporting requirements.

“The consequences for violating U.S. currency reporting laws are severe; penalties may include seizure of most or all of the traveler’s currency, or potential criminal charges,” said Daniel Escobedo, CBP’s Area Port Director for the Area Port of Washington, D.C. “Customs and Border Protection strongly encourages all travelers to be well informed of their role in CBP’s international arrivals inspection process at CBP’s Travel website.”

All travelers can avoid delays during their international arrival sinspection by learning what they can and cannot bring to the United States, and other admissions, immigration and reporting rules at CBP’s Know Before You Go webpage.

CBP officers have observed that smuggled bulk currency may be the proceeds of illicit activity, such as proceeds from the sales of dangerous drugs or revenue from financial crimes, and officers work hard to disrupt transnational criminal organizations by intercepting their currency smuggling attempts at our nation’s borders.

CBP seized about $342,000 every day last year in unreported or illicit currency along our nation’s borders. Learn more about what CBP accomplished during “A Typical Day” in 2021.


CBP’s border security mission is led at ports of entry by CBP officers from the Office of Field Operations. CBP officers screen international travelers and cargo and search for illicit narcotics, unreported currency, weapons, counterfeit consumer goods, prohibited agriculture, and other illicit products that could potentially harm the American public, U.S. businesses, and our nation’s safety and economic vitality. See what CBP accomplished during a typical day in 2021.

Please visit CBP Ports of Entry to learn more about how CBP’s Office of Field Operations secures our nation’s borders. Learn more about CBP at www.CBP.gov.

Follow the Director of CBP’s Baltimore Field Office on Twitter at @DFOBaltimore for breaking news, current events, human interest stories and photos, and CBP’s Office of Field Operations on Instagram at @cbpfieldops.