Three Florida Residents Arrested on Charges for Actions During Jan. 6 Capitol Breach

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FILE PHOTO: Signage is seen at the United States Department of Justice headquarters in Washington, D.C.

            WASHINGTON — Three Florida residents were arrested today on charges stemming from their actions during the breach of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Their actions and the actions of others disrupted a joint session of the U.S. Congress convened to ascertain and count the electoral votes related to the presidential election.

            Arrested were Leslie Gray, 56, Traci Isaacs, 52, and her husband, Luis Hallon, 67, all of St. Cloud, Florida.  They were named in a complaint filed in the District of Columbia. Gray is charged with civil disorder and obstruction of an official proceeding, both felonies, as well as misdemeanor offenses. Isaacs is charged with destruction of documents, a felony, and related misdemeanors, and Hallon is charged with misdemeanor offenses. All three defendants were arrested in St. Cloud and are expected to make their initial court appearances later today in the Middle District of Florida.

            According to court documents, Gray came to Washington with her friends, Luis Hallon, 67, and his wife, Traci Isaacs, 52, also of St. Cloud, Florida. Prior to Jan. 6, 2021, Isaacs submitted an application to volunteer with the Oath Keepers on Jan. 6 because she was a paramedic. As alleged in the complaint, the Oath Keepers are a large but loosely organized collection of individuals, some associated with militias. Though the Oath Keepers will accept anyone as members, they explicitly focus on recruiting current and former military, law enforcement, and first-responder personnel.

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            On Jan. 6, Gray, Hallon and Isaacs walked to the Capitol from the Ellipse. All illegally made their way onto the Capitol grounds and into the building. Isaacs and Hallon entered through the Rotunda Doors and remained inside the Capitol for about 14 minutes, from 3:02 to 3:16 p.m. Gray, meanwhile, entered the Capitol at 2:41 p.m., also through the Rotunda Doors, and traveled to multiple areas, including the Rotunda. She took videos inside the Capitol’s interior. In one, she stated, “I am in Congress. This is our house. This is our house! … I don’t know what we are doing now but we are in here. We’ve taken it.” She repeatedly yelled “traitor” at law enforcement officers and got past an officer who told her not to proceed further. She left the building at 2:57 p.m.

            Isaacs and others engaged in text messages about Jan. 6, which were deleted based on a review of her cellphone. Isaacs was interviewed by the FBI on March 29, 2021, and the FBI later was able to recover some of the deleted messages from an analysis of her cellphone. In one text message, she told an individual, “Delete anything I sent you please. Feds are going after people hard.”

            This case is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia and the Department of Justice National Security Division’s Counterterrorism Section. Valuable assistance was provided by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Florida.

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            The case is being investigated by the FBI’s Tampa Field Office and its Orlando Resident Agency. Valuable assistance was provided by the FBI’s Washington Field Office, and the U.S. Capitol Police.

            In the 17 months since Jan. 6, 2021, more than 840 individuals have been arrested in nearly all 50 states for crimes related to the breach of the U.S. Capitol, including over 250 individuals charged with assaulting or impeding law enforcement. The investigation remains ongoing.  Anyone with tips can call 1-800-CALL-FBI (800-225-5324) or visit tips.fbi.gov.

            A complaint  is merely an allegation, and all defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

 

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