A Las Cruces, New Mexico, Drug Leader Sentenced to 270 Months in Prison for Drug Trafficking in Sitka, Alaska

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A syringe with ampoules, white powder, a five-dollar bill with bullets and a gun lying on a black glass background. Dangerous bad habits, addiction to drugs and gambling. Crime because of drugs.

JUNEAU – A Las Cruces, New Mexico woman was sentenced by Chief U.S. District Judge Timothy M. Burgess today to 270 months in prison followed by 10 years of supervised release on drug trafficking and firearms charges.

According to the plea agreement, Christina Quintana aka “Lete,” 35, conspired to distribute and possess with intent to distribute quantities of methamphetamine and heroin in Sitka, Alaska and she possessed and discharged a firearm in furtherance of drug trafficking.  

Beginning about May 2, 2017, and continuing until April 3, 2018, Quintana, along with her co-conspirators Andrea Avalos, Peter Krovina, Porter Treadway, Holly Chambers, Aaron Didrickson and Eric Morisky distributed methamphetamine and heroin in Sitka. Quintana and Avalos, who did not reside in Alaska, were responsible for the transportation and distribution of methamphetamine and heroin as well as coordinating and collecting drug debts. The other members of the conspiracy assisted Quintana and Avalos in their illicit activities. All member of the drug organization possessed firearms to facilitate their drug trafficking activities, as well as to extract retribution against members who owed drug debts. For example, the defendants organized and perpetrated a violent home invasion and robbery where Quintana shot an individual in both legs and Treadway attacked another individual with a claw hammer, to collect a drug debt owed to them. In issuing today’s sentence Chief Judge Burgess said Quintana’s conduct was beyond the pale on that day.  

“Illicit narcotics are a cancer in our society and many Southeast Alaska communities have suffered at the hands of this epidemic for years,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Bryan Wilson of the District of Alaska. “The violence committed in this case has shaken the community of Sitka and is one of the worst drug offenses committed in Southeast Alaska in the last few decades.”

“The defendant came to Alaska for the sole financial motivation of trafficking illicit narcotics,” said Special Agent in Charge Antony Jung of the FBI Anchorage Field Office.  “Drug traffickers who believe they can operate with impunity, while bringing poison and violence to Alaska’s communities, will be held accountable by the FBI and our local, state, federal, and tribal law enforcement partners.” 

“The brazenness of Quintana’s actions clearly warrant this significant sentence,” said ATF Seattle Field Division Acting Special Agent in Charge Matthew Olson. “She showed a complete disregard for the law and jeopardized the community as a whole.  The removal of Quintana and her co-conspirators from the streets will help make our communities safer.” 

Quintana’s co-conspirators also pleaded guilty and have been sentenced:

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), and the Sitka Police Department investigated the case with assistance of the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS).

Assistant U.S. Attorney Jack Schmidt prosecuted the case.


This case is part of the U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Alaska Rural Alaska Anti-Violence Enforcement Network (RAAVEN) initiative’s ongoing efforts to increase engagement, coordination and action on public safety in Alaska Native communities. The case is also part of Alaska’s High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program and the South East Alaska Cities Against Drugs (SEACAD) task force. HIDTA was established in 2018 to enhance and coordinate efforts among local state and federal law enforcement agencies, providing equipment, technology and additional resources to combat drug trafficking and its harmful consequences in critical regions of Alaska. 

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