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Springfield Woman Sentenced to 11 Months in Prison for Three Counts Related to Assisting Inmates with Escape from the Sangamon County Jail

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FILE PHOTO: The U.S. Department of Justice Building is pictured

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – A Springfield, Illinois, woman, Allison Poorman, 28, of the 600 block of Douglas Avenue, has been sentenced to 11 months’ imprisonment, to be followed by three years of supervised release, along with a fine of $2,292.14, for conspiracy to commit escape of prisoners in the custody of an institution, conspiracy to possess contraband in prison, and providing or attempting to provide contraband in prison.

At the sentencing hearing, the government presented evidence that Poorman, along with co-defendant Josh Beechler, provided various contraband items to inmates James Russwinkel and Randy Bull while they were incarcerated in the Sangamon County Jail. The items were intended to be used by Russwinkel and Bull to escape from the jail. Some of the items smuggled into the jail included a hack saw, saw blades, zip ties, a cutting glove, a small pry bar, a handcuff key, rope, smoke bombs, and a cellular telephone. Their efforts were thwarted by an anonymous call to the jail.

At the hearing, U.S. District Court Judge Sue Myerscough described the effort taken to assist Russwinkel and Bull to escape from the jail as one of the most elaborate she has seen.

Poorman previously pleaded guilty in November 2021.


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The statutory penalties for conspiracy to commit escape of prisoners in the custody of an institution and conspiracy to possess contraband in prison include up to five years’ imprisonment; up to three years of supervised release; and up to a $250,000 fine. The statutory penalties for providing or attempting to provide contraband in prison include up to 10 years’ imprisonment; up to three years’ supervised release; and up to a $250,000 fine.

“The defendant’s actions to assist inmates in escaping from jail shows not only a disrespect for the law, but also placed correctional officers and other jail inmates in danger,” stated Assistant U.S. Attorney Sierra Senor-Moore. “The tools the defendant smuggled into the jail could have been used to harm people. We appreciate the efforts of involved law enforcement and the anonymous caller for preventing further damage or injury.”

The Sangamon County Sheriff’s Office and the United States Marshals investigated the case. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Tanner K. Jacobs and Senor-Moore represented the government in the prosecution.